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Program B: Incarceration

Program Authorization: R.S. 15:821-840.2 and R.S. 36:401-409

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The mission of the Incarceration Program is to provide for the custody, control, and care of adjudicated offenders through enforcement of the laws and implementation of programs designed to ensure the safety of the public, staff, and inmates.

The goals of the Incarceration Program are:

1. Maximize public safety through appropriate and effective correctional custodial and supervisory programs.

2. Provide for the safety of correctional staff and inmates by maintaining an organized and disciplined system of operations that promotes stability in the institution.

3. Ensure that basic services relating to adequate food, clothing, and shelter are provided to the inmate population.

4. Provide the maximum available bed space allowable by the State Fire Marshal, Department of Health and Hospitals, American Correctional Association requirements, budgeted resources, and good correctional practices.

5. Protect the investment by the state in the facility by providing an adequate maintenance program for all buildings and equipment and by following Division of Administration property control regulations.

The Incarceration Program encompasses all security and related costs. It also includes other services in keeping with the goal of providing for the custody and care of persons committed to the department's custody, such as the classification of inmates and related record-keeping, provision of basic necessities such as food, clothing, and laundry services for the inmate population, maintenance and support of the facility and other equipment, and Project Clean-Up. Project Clean-Up, a cooperative effort between the Department of Public Safety and Corrections, Corrections Services, and the Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD), involves inmate crews for litter pickup and DOTD work crews for mowing and litter collection. The project is a direct result of the commitment by Governor and Mrs. Foster to improve the appearance of roads and highways across the state.

The Intensive Motivational Program of Alternative Correctional Treatment (IMPACT) was established at EHCC in February 1987. It is one of several "boot camp" operations in the United States today. IMPACT is a two-part program, consisting of a period of 90 to 180 days of highly regimented, tightly structured incarceration (characterized by military drills and ceremony, physical training, strict discipline, and intense work programs) followed by a period of intensive parole supervision. The main purpose of IMPACT is to provide a satisfactory alternative to the long-term incarceration of primarily youthful first and second offenders; this will help relieve prison crowding conditions that exist throughout Louisiana. Louisiana's IMPACT program has received both national and international attention and has been featured in several newspapers and on national television. EHCC's Impact program received ACA accreditation in August 1994.

OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

1. In FY 1998-99, the Incarceration Program will provide for the secure confinement and support of offenders committed to that institution while maintaining a safe working environment for staff.

SECURITY TRENDS AT EHCC

 

1991-92

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

Number of inmates per corrections security officer

3.5

3.2

3.4

3.2

3.3

3.5

Number of escapes

1

1

1

2

1

0

Number of apprehensions

2

1

1

3

1

1

Number of major disturbances

Not Available1

0

0

0

1

0

Number of minor disturbances

Not Available1

166

172

186

319

166

Number of assaults:

a. Inmate on staff

b. Inmate on inmate

 

Not Available1

Not Available1

 

22

368

 

9

307

 

21

321

 

29

315

 

38

382

Number of sex offenses

Not Available1

38

60

77

80

95

1 Data for this indicator were not compiled during this fiscal year.

2. In FY 1998-99, the Incarceration Program will operate the IMPACT Program as an effective alternative to long-term incarceration of certain first and second offenders.

Outcome Indicator: A 1993 evaluation of shock incarceration (boot camp) programs in eight states, which was prepared for the National Institute of Justice, found that Louisiana's IMPACT program was one of only three programs in which evidence was found that the program reduced recidivism. It was also noted that those IMPACT graduates who do recidivate are more likely to do so for technical parole violations as opposed to new felony convictions. Study models determined that between 75% to 100% of Louisiana's boot camp entrants would have otherwise served time in prison and the study concluded that the IMPACT program reduced the need for prison beds.

EHCC IMPACT PROGRAM

 

1991-92

1992-93

1993-94

1994-95

1995-96

1996-97

Capacity

136

136

136

136

136

120

Number entering the program

246

338

350

441

424

3604

Number completing the program

139

163

203

206

228

211

Average number of days to complete program

135

120

120

120

120

120

RECIDIVISM IN ADULT CORRECTIONS (IMPACT GRADUATES)

(As of February 10, 1998)

RELEASE YEAR

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

Number released

177

146

182

171

162

235

158

Follow-up period

7 Years

6 Years

5 Years

4 Years

3 Years

2 Years

1 Year

Number returned

87

75

89

66

51

60

10

Recidivism rate 1

49.2%

51.4%

48.9%

38.6%

31.5%

25.5%

6.3%

1 Recidivism is defined as the return to Department of Public Safety and Corrections (DPS&C) custody following conviction for a new felony or technical revocation of supervision after having been released fromDPS&C incarceration through one of the following mechanisms: parole, goodtime, goodtime/parole supervision (dimunition of sentence), full-term, court order, or probation (split sentence; offender sentenced to probationary time after serving custody time for same sentence).

RESOURCE ALLOCATION FOR THE PROGRAM

SOURCE OF FUNDING

This program is funded with state general fund, interagency transfers, and fees and self-generated revenues. The interagency transfers are derived from the Department of Transportation and Development for security costs associated with providing inmate road cleanup crews. The fees and self-generated revenues are derived from the following: (1) employee purchase of meals; (2) funds received from the inmate canteen for reimbursement of administrative costs for managing the inmate canteen account; (3) funds received from private entities for the salaries of correctional officers who provide security for the telephone dismantling program; (4) funds received from Ascension Parish for the cost of security coverage of inmate work crews; (5) funds received from the inmate canteen for overtime of security officers assigned to the inmate canteen; (6) funds received from pay telephone commissions; (7) funds received from employees for housing; (8) funds received for reimbursement for identification cards and copier use; (9) miscellaneous expenses reimbursed by the Inmate Welfare Fund; and (10) medical co-payments required by inmates for certain medical visits and prescriptions.

ANALYSIS OF RECOMMENDATION

GENERAL FUND

TOTAL

T.O.

 

DESCRIPTION

 

 

 

 

 

$18,739,206

$19,247,269

629

 

ACT 18 FISCAL YEAR 1997-1998

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BA-7 TRANSACTIONS:

$123,450

$123,450

0

 

Carryforward for operating services, operating supplies, acquisitions and major repairs

 

 

 

 

 

$18,862,656

$19,370,719

629

 

EXISTING OPERATING BUDGET - December 10, 1997

 

 

 

 

 

($123,450)

($123,450)

0

 

Non-Recurring Carryforward for operating services, operating supplies, acquisitions and major repairs

($168,872)

($168,872)

0

 

Non-Recurring startup supplies for the 96-bed cellblock

$206,709

$206,709

0

 

Equipment/Major Repairs Adjustment(s) (Non-recurring: -$297,717; Replacement/New: + $504,426)

$317,143

$317,143

0

 

Annualization of 1997 -'98 Merit Pay Adjustment(s)

$290,198

$290,198

0

 

1998 -'99 Merit Pay Adjustment(s)

($272,788)

($272,788)

(10)

 

Personnel Reduction(s)

($1,019,690)

($1,019,690)

0

 

Attrition Adjustment(s)

$2,560

$2,560

0

 

Adjustment for interagency transfers with the Department of Public Safety for radio user fees

($77,308)

($77,308)

0

 

Retirement Rate Adjustment(s)

$140,753

$140,753

0

 

Security and operating supply costs associated with the 96-bed cellblock

$553,470

$553,470

0

 

Chase and Tact Team premium pay, Master Sergeant pay and Corrections Security Officer retention pay plans

$33,572

$33,572

1

 

Transfer one Facility Maintenance Manager position from the Corrections' Administration Budget, Office of Management and Finance Program, to properly reflect funding in the appropriate agency

 

 

 

 

 

            $18,744,953

     $19,253,016

     620

 

TOTAL RECOMMENDED

 

 

 

 

 

($117,703)

($117,703)

(9)

 

DIFFERENCE (TOTAL RECOMMENDED AND EXISTING OPERATING BUDGET)

 

 

 

 

 

The total means of financing for this program is recommended at 99.4% of the existing operating budget. It represents 84.9% of the total request ($22,692,320) for this program. The personnel reduction is due to the elimination of 10 (ten) vacant positions. The decrease in the recommended level is primarily attributed to the attrition adjustment. The elimination of the vacant positions along with the attrition adjustment are recommended to provide the necessary adjustments needed to fully fund the 620 recommended positions.

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

$4,600

 

Veterinary services performed on horses and dogs

 

 

 

$4,600

 

TOTAL PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

OTHER CHARGES

 

 

Interagency Transfers:

$2,760

 

User fee for radio system - Department of Public Safety

 

 

 

$2,760

 

TOTAL INTERAGENCY TRANSFERS

ACQUISITIONS AND MAJOR REPAIRS

$504,426

 

Replace four vehicles and various pieces of security, kitchen and maintenance equipment; replace condensing units and evaporator coils on coolers in warehouse, repair dormitory plumbing, locking mechanisms, repair boilers, replace storage tanks, rebuild chillers, replace current telephone system with ESSX telephone system.

 

 

 

$504,426

 

TOTAL ACQUISITIONS AND MAJOR REPAIRS


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